Golf

Snooker Cue

The first impression given by this game is that it is too simple to be interesting, and yet the tactical nature of Golf makes it one of the most competitive of all games.

It can be played in many ways:-

    by one player - as a kind of solitaire;
    by two players - with one or two sets of balls each;
    by three players - playing individually;
    or by four - playing individually or as pairs.

The best of these is when two players each use two sets - using one set to go round the table, and the other to block the opponent. This creates the best tactical challenge for both players.



Each player has his own cue-ball and object-ball, and this limits the game to a maximum of four players. The balls are given out in the following sets:-

white & red, yellow & green, brown & blue, and pink & black.

With their first stroke in the game, and after any foul, each player must place his object-ball on the Centre spot, and play his cue-ball at it from the 'D'.

The first player to pot his object-ball in all six pockets, in the numerical order shown in the diagram, wins the game. But care must be taken!

Any foul stroke means that the offending player forfeits one pocket, and returns to the pocket he was previously 'on'.

The Rules of Golf

Each player has his own cue-ball and object-ball which are given out in the following sets:-

    1st Player has the WHITE as the cue-ball and the RED as the object-ball
    2nd Player has the YELLOW as the cue-ball and the GREEN as the object-ball
    3rd Player has the BROWN as the cue-ball and the BLUE as the object-ball
    4th Player has the PINK as the cue-ball and the BLACK as the object-ball

The winner is the first player to pot his object-ball in all six pockets, in the numerical order shown in the diagram.

Golf Table

With their first stroke in the game, and with their next stroke after a foul, each player must place his object-ball on the Centre spot, and play the cue-ball at it from the 'D'.

When a player pots his object-ball in the correct pocket it is immediately replaced on the Centre Spot. He is then 'on' the next pocket, and plays a consecutive shot from the position where the cue-ball came to rest.

If a player fails to pot his object-ball, both balls remain in position, and his turn at the table is over.

For any foul stroke:-

    Both the player's balls must be removed from the table.
    The player forfeits one pocket, and must 'go-back' to the pocket he was previously 'on'.

If a player misses his object-ball, it is a foul, and any balls moved in the stroke must be returned to their original position.

If a player commits a foul after contacting his object-ball:-

    Any balls moved in the stroke remain in the position where they came to rest.
    If any ball is potted it remains off the table until the owner's next visit; it is then
    played from 'hand' if a cue-ball, or re-spotted on the Centre spot if an object-ball.
    If the Centre spot is occupied, the object-ball is re-spotted on the Pink spot; and
    if that is occupied it is re-spotted as it would be in snooker.
    If an object-ball was potted in the pocket that its owner was 'on', it counts to that
    player, who then progresses to the next pocket.

If a player pots his object-ball in any pocket he is not 'on', it is a foul.

If a player pots his cue-ball in any pocket, it is a foul.



Historical Notes
From "The Badminton Library: Billiards" by Major W. Broadfoot, pub. 1896.

There is an exercise, invented I believe by a weather-bound golfer in which the red is spotted on the centre spot, and the player starts from the D and tries to hole the red in all the pockets in turn in as few strokes as possible. The red is re-spotted on the centre spot every time it is holed, and the player plays on each occasion from where his ball has run to. This game is really excellent practise, for it involves accurate winning-hazard striking, combined with delicate strength and a knowledge of angles. I believe that 20 is considered what golfers would call the 'bogey' score; but I fancy it is placed a little too high, and I think 16 would be nearer the mark. As the learner improves he can lower the bogey to suit himself.



Snooker Cue