Fortification Billiards

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IntroductionRULES 27 - 52Rules 1 - 26


FORTIFICATION BILLIARDS
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  27.  If the striker forces either of his adversary's balls into his own fort which hath been taken, it is no prisoner of war, but the said striker wins two points.

  28.  If the striker forces either of his adversary's balls into his adversary's fort, he wins two points.

  29.  If the striker holes either of his adversary's balls, or two, &c. for each ball so holed he wins two points.

  30.  If the striker holes his own ball or balls, for each ball so holed he loses two points.

  31.  If the striker forceth his adversary's ball or balls over the table, or on a fort or cushion, for each ball he wins two points.

  32.  If the striker forces his own ball or balls over the table, or, &c. for each ball he loses two points.

  33.  If the striker forces his adversary's ball over the table, or on a fort or cushion, or into a hole, and regularly takes his adversary's fort by the same stroke, he wins six points. But if by the same stroke the striker's ball should go into a fort which hath been taken, or is out of the angle, he loses two points.

  34.  If the striker holes his own or his adversary's ball, or forces them over the table, or on a fort or cushion, he loses two points.

  35.  If the striker forces his ball into any of his own or adversary's forts, which had been taken, or into any of his adversary's forts out of the angle, he loses two points.

  36.  When a ball is holed or forced over the table, or on, & such ball is to be placed on its proper spot; but if it happens that the spot should be occupied by another ball, in such case the ball is to be placed behind, so as not to touch the other ball.

  37.  Whoever takes a fort after it has been regularly taken, and the colours are down, loses two points.

  38.  When the striker's adversary's ball is out of sight (that is, lying behind a fort so that it cannot be seen,) and the striker hath a fancy to strike the cushion first, and hit the said ball backwards, by giving warning, saying, I do not see, if he should hit the said ball, he wins two points; but if he should not hit the ball, he loses two points.

  39.  If, by the before-mentioned stroke, the striker should hit the ball, and holes his own ball, or forces it over the table, or on a fort or cushion, or into either of his own forts, or into either of his adversary's forts, which hath been taken,* or is out of the angle he loses two points.

  40.  If either of the adversary's balls should lie before either of the striker's forts, which hath not been taken, and (the said ball being out of sight) the striker hath a fancy to strike the cushion first, and hit the said ball backwards, to make a prisoner of war of his said adversary's ball, by saying I do not see, if he hits the ball, he wins two points, and if he makes a prisoner of war of his adversary's ball, he wins six points more, and his adversary's ball must return to its proper spot again.

  41.  When the striker gives warning, saying, I do not see, his adversary, or the disinterested company, have a right to be judges thereof, or the marker, if any dispute should arise thereon.

  42.  If the striker holes, or, & either of his adversary's defending balls, it is at his adversary's option to place the said ball on either of the proper spots, if they are both vacant.

  43.  Whoever toucheth both balls with mace or cue, it is deemed a foul stroke; therefore he cannot reckon any points he made by the said stroke, if it is discovered and proved to be so by the disinterested company and the marker; but if it is not discovered, the marker is obliged to reckon all the points made by the stroke. But if the said stroke is proved to be foul, then it is at his enemy's option either to break the balls, or to make him return to his proper spot again.

  44.  If the striker makes a foul stroke, and holes his own ball, or forces it over the table, & he loses two points for each of his own balls so holed or forced over the table; and it is at his adversary's option to part the balls, if he pleases.

  45.  If the striker moves the ball, it must be put back to the proper place it was moved from.

  46.  Whoever blows on his enemy's or on his own ball when running, it is deemed foul.   [See Article 42.]

  47.  If the striker, by blowing on his own ball, should put it out of its proper course, especially when running near a hole, he loses two points; and it is deemed foul.   [See Article 42.]

  48.  Whoever stops a ball with stick or otherwise after the stroke, it is deemed foul.   [See Article 42.]

  49.  Whoever plays with both feet off the ground, without permission from his enemy, it is deemed foul.   [See Article 42.]

  50.  Whoever plays upon a ball when running, it is deemed foul.   [See Article 42.]

  51.  Whoever retains his adversary's stick, when playing, loses two points; besides it is foul.   [See Article 42.]

  52.  Whoever gets the first twenty points, each fort being regularly taken is four points, wins the game.

When four parties play a double match, he who plays before his turn loses two points.
N.B. The rest of the necessary rules and regulations are to be found in the rules, &c. of the White Winning Game.

* Out of the Angle - Vide 21 and 22.


IntroductionRULES 27 - 52Rules 1 - 26


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