The White Winning Game

Snooker Cue

RULES 1 - 20Rules 41 - 60Rules 21 - 40


RULES AND REGULATIONS TO BE OBSERVED AT THE WHITE WINNING GAME.


The Game is Twelve in Number.

1.  When you begin, string for the lead, and the choice of balls, if you please.

2.  When a person strings for the lead, he must stand within the limits of the corner of the table, and likewise must not place his ball beyond the stringing nails or spots; and the person who brings his ball nearest the cushion wins the lead.

3.  If after the first person has strung for the lead, and his adversary who follows him should make his ball touch the other, he loses the lead.

4.  If the player holes his own ball, either in stringing or leading, he loses the lead.

5.  If the leader follows his ball with either mace or cue past the middle hole, it is no lead, and if his adversary chuses, he may make him lead again.

6.  The striker who plays at the lead, must stand with both his feet within the limits of the corner of the table, and must not place his ball beyond the stringing nails or spots; and his adversary (only) is bound to see that he stands and plays fair, otherwise the striker wins all the points he made by that stroke.

7.  When a hazard has been lost in either of the corner holes, the leader is obliged (if his adversary requires it) to lead from the end of the table, where the hazard was lost; but if the hazard was lost in either of the middle holes, it is at the leader's option to lead from either end of the table he pleases.

8.  If the striker does not hit his adversary's ball, he loses one point; and if by the said stroke his ball should go into a hole, over the table, or on a cushion, he loses three points, viz. one for missing the ball, and two for holing it, &c. and he loses the lead.

9.  If the striker holes either his own or adversary's ball, or both of them, or forces either or both of them over the table, or on a cushion, he loses two points.

10.  No person hath a right to take up his ball without permission from his adversary.

11.  If the striker, should touch or move his own ball, not intending to make a stroke, it is deemed as an accident; and his adversary may put the ball back in the place where it stood.

12.  If the striker forces his adversary's ball over the table, and his adversary should chance to stop it, so as to make it come on the table again, the striker nevertheless wins two points.

13.  If the striker forces his own ball over the table, and his adversary should chance to stop it, so as to make it come on the table again, the striker loses nothing by the stroke, and he hath the lead: because his adversary ought not to stand in the way, or near the table.

14.  If the striker misses the ball and forces it over the table, and it should be stopped by his adversary, as before mentioned, he loses one point, and has the lead, if he chuses.

15.  If the striker, in playing from a cushion or otherwise, by touching the ball, makes his mace or cue go over or past it, he loses one point; and if his adversary requires it he may put the ball back, and may make him pass the ball.

16.  If the striker, in attempting to make a stroke, doth not touch his ball, it is no stroke; and he must try again to make a stroke.

17.  If when the balls are near each other, and the striker by accident should make his ball touch the other ball, it is nevertheless a stroke, though not intended as such.

18.  If the striker who plays the stroke should make his adversary's ball go so near the brink of a hole, as to be judged to stand still, and afterwards should fall into it, the striker wins nothing; and the ball must be put on the same brink where it stood, for his adversary to play for the next stroke. N.B. There is no occasion for challenging the ball if it stops, as some persons imagine.

19.  If the striker's ball should stand on the brink or edge of a hole, and if in playing it off he should make the ball go in, he loses three points.

20.  If a ball should stand on the brink or on the edge of a hole, and it should fall into the hole, before or when the striker has delivered his ball from his mace or cue, so as to have no chance for his stroke, in that case, the striker's and his adversary's balls must be placed in the same position, or as near as possible thereto, and the striker must play again.


RULES 1 - 20Rules 41 - 60Rules 21 - 40


Snooker Cue